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Your logo is often the first impression that someone has of your company. However, it’s more than just an introduction—logos tell a story about a company.

Not only does the font need to be legible, it also has to align with the business brand, the color choices, and the design image. Because a logo’s font choice impacts what kind of story is told, having a basic knowledge of digital typography is greatly beneficial to anyone designing a logo.

Typography is essentially the art of designing and placing type–digital typography is just taking this art form into the digital realm. Before embarking on the difficult task of choosing the right font for your logo, get yourself familiar with these 6 basic digital typography tips:

1) TYPEFACE AND FONT ARE TWO DIFFERENT THINGS

The term typeface is used to describe the creative, abstract design itself while a font is the actual physical representation of the design. In other words, someone designed the Helvetica typeface and we can use the Helvetica font on our computers.

When it comes to the sophisticated world of typography, some people are purists, while others have a laid-back, do-whatever-looks-good mentality. No matter what side you’re on, it’s important to learn the language of design, especially type — this applies to all designers, curious commoners and even some developers, so buckle up! You’re about to learn something…

Here’s a bit of information that I never knew until two days ago while working with Typecache for our list of 30 alternatives to Helvetica:

“Font” and “typeface” are not interchangeable.

“Typeface” should be used when referring to the design, while “font” should be used when referring to the file, copy or file-type. For example, there is only one Times New Roman typeface designed by Victor Lardent, but nearly everyone with a computer has a copy of that font. A font is what you actually use.
Check out this great resource on typographic terms you should now. (https://designschool.canva.com/blog/typography-terms/)

2) DON’T STRAY AWAY FROM DEFAULT FONTS

Just because fonts like Times New Roman and Arial are old standards, this doesn’t mean they aren’t appropriate choices for your logo. They’re legible, clear, and when used well, they don’t come off as dull or uninspired. After all, these fonts are defaults for a reason.

3) DON’T USE MORE THAN TWO FONTS IN ONE DESIGN

More than two fonts makes the logo look messy and thrown together. Two fonts, however, provides a nice contrast. Consider using one font for your business name and another for the slogan.

4) ONLY MIX CONTRASTING FONTS IN ONE DESIGN

The contrast between a serif and sans serif font makes a design look fresh and exciting. By the way, a serif font has small “feet” or little decorative additions on the ends of the character strokes. Sans serif fonts do not have these additions. Times New Roman is a serif font while Arial is sans serif.

5) BE FAMILIAR WITH THE ART OF KERNING

Kerning is the adjustment of spacing between letters to increase readability and improve overall appearances. If you want to delve further into the art of digital typography, learn kerning tips and tricks here.
(http://designshack.net/articles/typography/8-simple-and-useful-tips-for-kerning-type/)

6) EACH TYPEFACE HAS A PERSONALITY

Make sure that you choose a design with a personality that accurately matches up with your brand and mission. For example, Times New Roman has a straightforward, business-like character. It’s an apt choice for, say, an insurance company. If an insurance company’s logo used Comic Sans, which has a more playful and unprofessional personality, this would be a confusing and altogether ineffective message.

Once you’ve thought about your logo’s font choice, check out our home page  – bouncemarketing.org to quickly find our offices (610 Deltona Blvd, Ste D Exit 108 off Interstate 4). We are glad to help you pick the best logo colors, create custom artwork, and fonts too!

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